Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share on Google+ Share by Email

Skip to content

Key resources

  • Bibliography
    Bibliography
  • Health promotion
    Health promotion
  • Health practice
    Health practice
  • Yarning places
    Yarning places
  • Programs
    Programs
  • Organisations
    Organisations
  • Conferences
    Conferences
  • Courses
    Courses
  • Funding
    Funding
  • Glossary
    Glossary
 

New web resource to help reduce harmful tobacco use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Date posted: 19 October 2015

Edith Cowan University's Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre today launched a tobacco section which will support efforts to reduce harmful tobacco use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

This important addition to the Knowledge Centre provides the evidence base to reduce harms from tobacco use and complements the comprehensive resources made available through the Knowledge Centre on alcohol and other drugs.

HealthInfoNet Director, Professor Neil Drew, says 'The new section on tobacco use provides up to date, relevant information for people working, studying or interested in addressing the harms of tobacco use and its link with chronic diseases.'

The new section provides information on current and completed programs and projects, organisations that are addressing issues related to tobacco use, publications which focus on key areas of smoking, and health promotion and health practice resources to assist health workers and community members. A collection of relevant national and state policies on tobacco use can also be found here. A workforce section is included to provide information about training, funding, conferences and career opportunities.

Tobacco is one of the leading contributors to the burden of disease among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [1]. It increases the risk of chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease, many forms of cancer and lung diseases.

Smoking among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has been gradually declining since 2002, however the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who smoke is still high (44%) compared to non-Indigenous people (17%)[2,3]. Many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people would like to quit or reduce their smoking.


1. Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council (2015) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health performance framework 2014 report. Canberra: Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet
2. Burns J, Burrow S, Drew N, Elwell M, Gray C, Harford-Mills M, Hoareau J, Lynch R, MacRae A, O’Hara T, Potter C, Ride K, Trzesinski A (2015) Overview of Australian Indigenous health status, 2014. Perth, WA: Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet
3. Australian Bureau of Statistics (2013) Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey: first results, Australia, 2012-13. (ABS Catalogue no. 4727.0.55.001) Canberra: Australian Bureau of Statistics

Contacts

Spokesperson
Professor Neil Drew
Director
Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet
Ph: (08) 9370 6155
Email: n.drew@ecu.edu.au

Media Contact
Tara Hoyne
Development and Marketing Manager
Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet
Ph: (08) 9370 6109
Email: t.hoyne@ecu.edu.au

Links

 
Last updated: 21 October 2015
 
Return to top
 
spacing
 


Australia's National Research Centre on AOD Workforce Development National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre National Drug Research Institute