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          • » Positive changes in Australians’ smoking patterns but more work needed to close the gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders: report

Positive changes in Australians’ smoking patterns but more work needed to close the gap for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders: report

Date posted: 4 October 2016

Tobacco smoking remains a major cause of many health problems, but according to a new report from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), Australians' smoking behaviours are improving-with some groups improving more than others. The report, Tobacco Indicators: measuring mid-point progress: reporting under the National Tobacco Strategy 2012-2018, measures smoking behaviours in Australia against a range of indicators, and shows that across most, Australia is progressing well.

While improvements were seen across all population groups ,Indigenous smoking rates are not improving at the same rate as non-Indigenous Australians, across a number of indicators.

Similar findings were seen for people living in remote and very remote areas. Daily smoking rates significantly improved among people living in the lowest and second-lowest socioeconomic areas, but not at the same rate as those living in the highest socioeconomic area.

The report showed unclear results when it came to quitting, but some positive results were recorded among people who had smoked more than 100 cigarettes in their lifetime (referred to in the report as 'ever-smokers'). Since the baseline report, the proportion of adult ever-smokers who have now quit smoking has risen from 47% to 52%.' In 2013, more than half (52%) of adult ever-smokers had quit smoking (they had not smoked in the last 12 months). This was an increase from 47% in 2010.

Source: AIHW

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Last updated: 4 October 2016
 
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Australia's National Research Centre on AOD Workforce Development National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre National Drug Research Institute