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Pack warning labels help Aboriginal smokers butt out

Date posted: 30 January 2017

Pack warning labels are motivating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander smokers to quit smoking according to new research released by Menzies School of Health Research. The study has shown that graphic warning labels not only motivate quit attempts but increase Indigenous smokers awareness of the health issues caused by smoking.

The study found that 30% of Indigenous smokers at baseline said that pack warning labels had stopped them having a smoke when they were about to smoke.

Forming part of the national Talking About the Smokes study led by Menzies in partnership with Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services, the 642 study participants completed baseline surveys and follow-up surveys a year later.

Professor David Thomas, explained the significance of this finding, 'Reacting to warning labels by forgoing a cigarette may not seem like much on its own. However, forgoing cigarettes due to warning labels was associated with becoming more concerned about the health consequences of smoking, developing an interest in quitting and attempting to quit. This is significant for our understanding of future tobacco control strategies'.

Source: Menzie School of Health Research

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Last updated: 22 February 2017
 
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Australia's National Research Centre on AOD Workforce Development National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre National Drug Research Institute