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Call for immediate changes to alcoholic drink labelling

Date posted: 7 December 2017

The Government of Western Australia has called for mandatory pregnancy health warnings on alcoholic beverages, and has warned against inaction on implementing effective mandatory labels is risking the health of unborn children.

Hon Roger Cook, Deputy Premier, Health and Mental Health Minister, says the call is based on an important public health issue which requires immediate attention. 

'Increasing awareness of the dangers of alcohol consumption during pregnancy and while breastfeeding is essential. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a serious public health issue which has lifelong consequences for people with the disorder and their families. However, the condition is avoidable and more needs to be done to ensure that pregnant women are aware of the dangers,' said Minister Cook.

'There is no reason why mandatory labelling on alcoholic products sold in Australia cannot be implemented immediately. The failure to act on this issue is inexcusable and is putting lives of vulnerable children at risk. I call on my counterparts in the Commonwealth, State and Territory governments to support my position on mandatory pregnancy health warning labelling of alcoholic beverages at the upcoming Australia and New Zealand Ministerial Forum on Food Regulation on November 24, 2017,' he added.

The McGowan Government is also calling on the Commonwealth, States and Territories, to immediately support the initiative.

Source: Government of Western Australia Media Statements

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Last updated: 7 December 2017
 
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